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In Space, Everyone Can Hear You Snore - Preview by TankaaKumawani In Space, Everyone Can Hear You Snore - Preview by TankaaKumawani
Music Selection: Johan Strauss - Thousand and One Nights Waltz www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1Z27o…
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2007 AP, in a Consolidated Airlines shuttle somewhere along an Arth Stationary Transfer Trajectory...

It's not a Pan-Continental narrowbody, and it sure isn't business class.  Nor is it an almost-empty flight.  The aramid fleece blankets are decent, at least, and if you tuck it in underneath yourself your arms won't float around.  Earplugs are a must, although the avian in the foreground probably needs to make sure theirs are in securely.

Both Planetes and 2001 get their references here.  In fact, I'm redesigning the SSTO to look more like the Rockwell Star Raker design study.  Cabin crew uniforms trend more towards nomex boiler suits and glorified bike helmets in this universe, even if the interior colors are groovy.

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Artwork, original characters © of me
Other characters © of their respective owners

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"A tonsillectomy will not save you from the effects of Puffy Face Syndrome."
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:iconvumpalouska:
Vumpalouska Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2018
And this is why you put your passengers in cryo-sleep during spaceflights.
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:icontankaakumawani:
TankaaKumawani Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Heh, that’s the trouble with surface-to-orbit hops. It just isn’t worth the extra expense in terms of 12-24 hours of life support versus the extra monitoring requirements and IV drip. Induced torpor recovery makes a typical case of rocket lag seem mild. (If a significant number of the passengers are distant descendants of Jake Garn, the equation is different.)
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:iconkeyotea:
Keyotea Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I would think that in the sci-fi future, someone has discovered a cure for snoring and spread the knowledge around.
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:icontankaakumawani:
TankaaKumawani Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You can't fix fluid distribution in microgravity.  Especially when the passengers are drowsy from anti-nausea medication.  (My former roommate said I tended to snore if I was on antihistamines, as I would sleep in positions that I normally wouldn't.)
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:iconptrevor-dactyl:
Ptrevor-Dactyl Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
It's really fascinating how the once amazing becomes the boring routine. In cases like this I think of things like my grandfather, who seen his first car when he was 12, back in 1915. What he must have thought I can't imagine. One of his first purchases when he came to America was a 1924 Model T, with his last car being a 1993 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ceirra.
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:icontankaakumawani:
TankaaKumawani Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Mind you, this was only practicable in Ori’s universe because of StarTrade Corporation’s recontact efforts (and probably subsidies)...although it is pretty much doable with late 20th Century tech if there’s enough of an economic justification. Or SDI had managed to get thoroughly out of hand. (Federated States of Anacostia Politician: “We need to launch 100 tons of satellite yesterday! Those Volgan pinkos can throw 80 ton killer satellites into orbit! We can’t allow a satellite gap!” “With all due respect Mr. President, you need to take your beta blockers. We’ll meet with the nice man from North Anacostia-Punderson Aerospace later today...”)
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:iconjeszasz:
JESzasz Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2018  Student Traditional Artist
 There is also the concern of radiation and the deterioration of bone calcium in zero-G. How many people will want to actually stay in space for any length of time knowing that it increases the risk of cancer? Not me. 

 Granted that I think there are ways to help at least reduce exposure, such as lead or water, but all methods that I am aware of would add a lot of weight, which means having to use more fuel...

 
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:icontankaakumawani:
TankaaKumawani Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The habs and long-distance transport vessels are both better-shielded and have spin-gee (or in rare cases, glitterworld-tech ManiField systems), a day or two is probably not going to be that big of a risk short of major stellar activity.  Short-hop shuttles and landers generally don't need to worry about the long-term exposure considerations that much.

I wish we had been able to launch the centrifuge accommodations module (for test animals) to the ISS, or that the torodial Bigelow module wasn't stuck in development hell.  It would be nice to figure out what the minimum gravity requirements for long-term habs and long duration flights might be.
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:iconjeszasz:
JESzasz Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2018  Student Traditional Artist
 I think that you misunderstood the intent of my comment.

 I was stating the reasons why space travel and tourism so rare in the real world, not here! I safely assumed that the transports depicted here have means to keep radiation exposure down to the point where you are more likely to win  the lottery and get struck by lightning in the same day than come down with cancer. As for how much that would be, I think that William Black would probably be able to answer that sort of question. He's very familiar with realistic space travel.

 I also assume that any habitats would have spin-gee for long-term habitation. William Black might also be able to explain why spin-gee centrifugal habitation modules have never made it off the drawing board, though if I had to guess, I'd say that keeping it running constantly, and more importantly, from working itself loose is easier said than done.

 
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:icontankaakumawani:
TankaaKumawani Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, I very much misunderstood your comment.

It's probably a balancing or rotating seal issue.  (The small animal test one on the other hand fell victim to cost overruns and post-Columbia shuttle flight scheduling issues.)
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:iconekairim:
Ekairim Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
let us not speak of someone farts XD
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:icontankaakumawani:
TankaaKumawani Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Everyone probably has congestion, and typical spacecraft are rather funky anyway. www.projectrho.com/public_html…

(This probably isn’t as much of an issue for large habs.)
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:iconekairim:
Ekairim Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
it is the thought that counts?
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:icontankaakumawani:
TankaaKumawani Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes.
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